IFF

    Impact of Exogenous Enzymes in Sorghum- or Wheat-Based Broiler Diets on Nutrient Utilization and Growth Performance

    The impact of two enzyme preparations in either sorghum- or wheat-based broiler diets on nutrient utilization and growth performance was determined. One preparation (Enzyme A) combined protease, xylanase and ▀-glucanase activities and the second (Enzyme P) contained xylanase activity. Sorghum- or wheat-based starter (1-14 days), grower (15-28) and finisher (29-42) diets without or with either Enzyme A or Enzyme P were offered to broilers from 1-42 days post-hatch. Each of the six dietary treatments was offered to six replicates of six birds per cage. Total excreta collections were completed in the grower and finisher phases to determine the effects of dietary treatments on nutrient utilization as assessed by Apparent Metabolizable Energy (AME), Nitrogen (N) retention and N-corrected AME (AMEn). Both preparations contained similar levels of xylanase activity and enhanced nutrient utilization in wheat-based broiler diets with more pronounced responses in the finisher phase. In this phase, Enzyme A significantly increased AME by 0.98 MJ, N retention by 4.80 percentage units and AMEn by 0.95 MJ/kg. Similarly, Enzyme P increased AME by 1.21 MJ, N retention by 4.25 percentage units and AMEn by 1.24 MJ/kg. In contrast, enzyme inclusions in sorghum-based grower and finisher diets did not influence nutrient utilization and this is reflected in significant treatment interactions (p<0.001) for AME and AMEn in the finisher phase. In broilers offered wheat based diets, both enzymes similarly improved growth performance, Enzyme A and Enzyme P significantly improved feed efficiency by 7.0% and 7.1%, respectively, from 1-42 days post-hatch. In sorghum-based diets, Enzyme P numerically depressed feed efficiency, whereas Enzyme A marginally enhanced feed efficiency and increased weight gain by 6.7%, which closely approached significance (p<0.06). Kafirin is the dominant protein fraction in sorghum and the possibility that the protease component in Enzyme A, subtilisin, has the capacity to degrade kafirin is considered.
    Document information
    Product / service: Carbohydrases and Proteases
    Publication date: 01/01/2010
    Species: Poultry, Broiler
    Authors: Selle PH, Cadogan DJ, Ru YJ, Partridge G
    Doctype: Publications & Citations
    Publication / conference: International Journal of Poultry Science, volume 9, issue 1
    Regions and countries: Global
    Keywords: activity, ame, amen, apparent, metabolizable, energy, birds, broiler, diets, broilers, capacity, dan, diet, dietary, effects, efficiency, enzyme, preparations, enzymes, excreta, exogenous, feed, finisher, gain, grower, growth, performance, inclusion, interaction, interactions, n, retention, nitrogen, nutrient, utilization, p, per, post, hatch, post-hatch, posthatch, preparation, protease, protein, response, sorghum, sorghum-based, starter, subtilisin, treatment, weight, xylanase
    Production challenge(s): Gut health
    Diets: Wheat, Wheat and barley & high fibre by-products
    Brands: Avizyme® 1300, Avizyme® 1200, Axtra® AB, Axtra® XAP, Axtra® PHY, Optimize Feed, Phyzyme® XP, Phycheck, Danisco Xylanase, FASTKit assay
    Resource ref: 11131
    This material is related to a conference
    Recently viewed

    Your single source for articles, publications & citations, product information and more...

    Much of the content on this site is freely available. Register now to receive email notifications based on your content preferences. Partners may also request access to the restricted area of the Knowledge Centre for technical product information such as trial data, reports and much more.

    Register for content notifications
    x

    DuPont's Nutrition & Biosciences and IFF are coming together

    This isn't about forming another industry giant. This is about merging curiosity and capability to create unique, leading-edge solutions at the intersection of science and creativity.

    To learn more about IFF and the merger, go to www.iff.com.